Category Archives: The Early Church

Outline of “A History of Philosophy, Volume 1: Greece and Rome” by Frederick Copleston, S.J.

Copleston History of Philosophy, Volume 1: Greece and Rome Outline (This is an attempt to present the outline which Copleston gives within this work – feel free to request Word doc version of this outline). The autonumbering is messed up, and I’m … Continue reading

Posted in Aristotle, Augustine, Being, Classics, culture, faith and reason, Frederick Copleston, history, morality, Ontology, Paganism, philosophy, Plato, religious studies, the Classical world, The Early Church, The Self, the virtues, theology, Tradition | Leave a comment

The Trinitarian anthropology of St. Augustine

“Who can understand the omnipotent Trinity? We all speak of it, though we may not speak of it as it truly is, for rarely does a soul know what it is saying when it speaks of the Trinity. People wrangle … Continue reading

Posted in Augustine, Being, Dante, Ontology, religious studies, The Early Church, The Self, theology, Thomas Aquinas, Tradition, Trinitarian theology, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The development of Christmas (Feast of the Nativity) being celebrated December 25

“NATIVITY, Feast of the. Similarly to other comparable feasts (6 or 10 Jan, 18 Nov, 28 March), in Rome the tradition developed of keeping the feast of Christmas on 25 Dec; this dates to ca. 336, though it is mentioned … Continue reading

Posted in Christmas, Church, history, Paganism, religious studies, The Christian Year, The Early Church, Tradition, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Summary and Outline of St. Athanasius’ “On the Incarnation”

Summary of St. Athanasius’ ‘On the Incarnation’ “His treatise on the Incarnation of the Word of God, though written quite early in his life, and before the rise of Arianism, is the best example of his theology, and is of … Continue reading

Posted in Being, belief, Church, Classics, Eastern Christianity, faith and reason, Love and Creation, Ontology, RC doctrine, religious studies, Scripture, the Classical world, The Early Church, theology, Tradition, Trinitarian theology, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Meaning of ‘Hypostasis’ – Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity

“As a technical term, hypostasis is found first in the Greek natural sciences, meaning sediment in a liquid. Behind this is a twofold idea, solidification and visibility, which appears in every use of the word, with one aspect or the other … Continue reading

Posted in Aristotle, Being, Eastern Christianity, Ontology, Origen, philosophy, religious studies, the Classical world, The Early Church, theology, Uncategorized, Yannaras | 2 Comments

Maximus the Confessor on the Incarnation

… On the incarnation being part of God’s divine plan from all eternity, irrespective of humanity’s primal disobedience. “He who, by the sheer inclination of his will, established the beginning of all creation, seen and unseen, before all the ages … Continue reading

Posted in Eastern Christianity, humanism, Love and Creation, Maximus the Confessor, religious studies, The Early Church, The Self, theology, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

‘My name is John Daker’ as a theological parable about the relationship between eros and agape and the virtue of perseverance. ;)

Recently I was reminded of the video ‘My name is John Daker’ and it got me thinking… Initially, I was a bit baffled by the medley of two songs, one a classic Christian hymn celebrating the resurrection and the other … Continue reading

Posted in Dante, humour, Love, Origen, The Early Church, the virtues, Uncategorized | Leave a comment