Category Archives: Frederick Copleston

The Christian mystical experience and the limits of language

“If the mystic wishes to describe the mystical union of the soul with God and its effects, he has to make use of words which are not designed to express any such thing. For example, in order to express the … Continue reading

Posted in Evelyn Underhill, Frederick Copleston, Language, Meister Eckhart, Philosophers and Theologians, philosophy, prayer, RC doctrine, religious studies, theology, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Outline of “A History of Philosophy, Volume 1: Greece and Rome” by Frederick Copleston, S.J.

Copleston History of Philosophy, Volume 1: Greece and Rome Outline (This is an attempt to present the outline which Copleston gives within this work – feel free to request Word doc version of this outline). The autonumbering is messed up, and I’m … Continue reading

Posted in Aristotle, Augustine, Being, Classics, culture, faith and reason, Frederick Copleston, history, morality, Ontology, Paganism, philosophy, Plato, religious studies, the Classical world, The Early Church, The Self, the virtues, theology, Tradition | Leave a comment

Frederick Copleston on the limits of human language and metaphysics

“Language is primarily designed to refer to the objects of our sense-experience, and is very often found inadequate for the precise expression of metaphysical truths. Thus we speak, and cannot well help speaking, of “God foreseeing,” a phrase that, as … Continue reading

Posted in affirmation of images, Classics, Frederick Copleston, philosophy, Plato, religious studies, Scientific "knowing", Scripture, the Classical world, theology, Uncategorized | Leave a comment